Alagbon Close. Part 1 2019-01-10

Alagbon Close Rating: 7,4/10 1965 reviews

Part 1

Alagbon Close

Allen is a lithe-limbed colossus, his soon-to-be signature rhythms at times pushing the band forward with extraordinary percussive power, at others drawing it back like a coiled spring, only to unleash it again. Fela, though, is the main attraction. Lyrically, it is a full-on confrontation with an enforcing power of the Nigerian state: Alagbon Close in Lagos was the headquarters of the Nigerian Criminal Investigation Department. Turning off will mean that your activity is not sent to these services. Fela wrote the track Alagabon Close to lampoon the police after he was detained at the police station— which, not coincidentally, is located in a cul de sac of the same name. Every record is shipped in original factory-applied shrink wrap and has never been touched by human hands.

Next

Fela Ransome Kuti & The Africa 70

Alagbon Close

Fela Kuti was a composer that deserves to be mentioned alongside greats such as Wagner, Steve Reich or the Beatles - this is not an exaggeration; Fela was the leading musical genius of a continent that is often overlooked. In what was becoming Kuti's trademark lyric writing style, the title track—sung in the Broken English he adopted to communicate beyond only Yoruba speakers—highlights a particular social injustice to make a broader point. Alagbon Close is the name of the street that houses the police headquarters of Lagos, Nigeria. It takes the driving, downbeat-heavy funk of James Brown and the rhythmic sophistication of traditional Yoruba music and twists them both into an unstoppable force. First up, Alagbon Close by Fela Ransome Kuti as he then was and Africa 70 as it then was , the 1974 album which marked a watershed in the development of the music. Another gem in Fela Kuti's incredible discography. Review Summary: Starting revolutions to make music to start revolutions to.

Next

Alagbon Close (1974/75)

Alagbon Close

It's maybe why it has taken Afrobeat years to recover from his death. Over the course of the decade he released over 35 albums, many of them classic and none of them far below brilliant. The year 1974 marked a second milestone. In Alagbon Close, Fela tells us, you can be detained indefinitely, you will be brutalized, you will be treated as an animal — the police have no respect for human beings. Musically, the two tracks on this album each over ten minutes in length are typical of his '70s output.

Next

Force C.I.D Alagbon, Ikoyi

Alagbon Close

The question is should we move in, out, or just linger at the doorway. In 1977, during the army's biggest and most shameful assault on Kalakuta, his elderly mother, a revered anti-colonialist, was thrown out of a first floor window by soldiers, hastening her death. Fela called his music African Classical, and his intensely detailed arrangements justify the title. Kuti was held for several days, moved between Alagbon Close police station, which was situated nearby, and a military hospital, as the authorities waited in vain for him to produce evidence of a swallowed joint. Now in its 25th anniversary year, Alagbon Close is less widely celebrated than the international breakthrough albums Fela Kuti went on to make during the latter half of the 1970s—but it was, nevertheless, an important milestone.

Next

Alagbon Police Station

Alagbon Close

Fela's sons, particularly Seun, are releasing fantastic, angry and powerful Afrobeat albums, and former members of the Africa '70 like Dele Sosimi and Tony Allen continue to bring the music to life on stages around the world. The gun wey dem take your money to buy. This is the first in a series of articles which will chronicle significant recordings, people and events in the story of Afrobeat, from its inception until the present day. On the title track he bravely exposes the brutality going on in the Alagbon Close police cells. Only Registered Members can submit Business Reviews. Packaging All items are shipped brand-new and unopened in original packaging.

Next

Alagbon Police Station

Alagbon Close

At times the trumpets will lock in with the bass player, at other times they will be playing a twisting call-and-response. This record is part of a number of re-issued vinyl records from the mighty Fela Kuti. It also feels appropriate to mention him alongside figures from the world of classical music such as Wagner. Na tailor de sew em like your dress. Our Vision is to make Nigeria safer and more secure for economic development and growth; to create a safe and secure environment for everyone living in Nigeria.

Next

Fela Kuti

Alagbon Close

In this deeply anti-establishment song, Fela describes the harsh tactics that the police employ to control society, detailing their favoritism of the wealthy elite and their mistreatment of the poor. Later in 1974, the police, and in early 1977, the army, mounted successively bigger and more vicious attacks on Kalakuta, which will be the focus of the second article in this series. Wrasse Records' lovingly put together Kuti reissue series pairs Alagbon Close with an earlier release, Why Black Man Dey Suffer. Recorded in 1970, this was one of several albums Kuti made with the participation of the British drummer, , who was at the time in Nigeria recharging his Cream and Blind Faith-depleted batteries. Perhaps, though, his greatest quality was the fire and anger that he kept throughout his career, undimmed even after spending most of the '80s locked up in jail on false charges. Well recorded and excellently remastered , Africa 70 plays with unprecedented fire: the four-piece horn section was never more majestic; the nagging riffs and ostinatos of the tenor and rhythm guitars never more insistent.

Next

Alagbon Police Station

Alagbon Close

Alagbon Close is one of Kuti's greatest discs, establishing a benchmark for subsequent 1970s' classics like Zombie 1976 , Sorrow Tears And Blood 1977 and V. Even with a twenty-plus piece band, and with every instrument audible and upfront, it never feels cluttered. Afrobeat really is easy to love. The album announced the coming of age of the genre the Nigerian songwriter, vocalist, keyboard player and saxophonist co-created with the drummer and Africa 70 band leader,. His personality pushes the music along at a rattling place, whether it be through his recklessly dynamic organ parts or his fearless lyrics. Are you interested in this business? You can choose to opt out of the following cookies: Analytics Cookies Google Analytics is used to track usage of this website anonymously. One of Tony Allen's most inventive polyrhythmic patterns holds the song together and the interplay between the different sections of the band is masterful.

Next